Help your Au Pair provide safe food for your baby

Here is a guideline of foods to avoid giving a small child, age 1-2 years. Even with extensive training and child care experience, be sure to provide your Au Pair some direction as to what food is and is not appropriate for your child based on his or her age.

For more information about Go Au Pair and a cultural child care experience for your family, visit www.goaupair.com or contact LAR Joan Lowell in the Providence, RI and surrounding areas at jlowell@goaupair.com or 401.309.1925.

We have over 300 available Au Pairs from over 30 countries. We also have in-country Au Pairs who are looking to match with new Host Families. Consider a cultural child care experience for your family.

Foods to avoid: 12 to 24 months

Low-fat milk: Most young toddlers need the fat and calories of whole milk for growth and development. Once your child turns 2 (and if he doesn’t have any growth problems), you can start giving him lower-fat milk if you like. (If your child is at risk for obesity or heart disease, however, the doctor may recommend introducing low-fat milk before age 2.)

Choking hazards to watch out for

Large chunks: A chunk of food larger than a pea can get stuck in your child’s throat. Vegetables like carrots, celery, and green beans should be diced, shredded, or cooked and cut up. Cut fruits like grapes, cherry tomatoes, and melon balls into quarters before serving, and shred or cut meats and cheeses into very small pieces.

Small, hard foods: Hard candies, cough drops, nuts, and popcorn are potential choking hazards. Seeds may be too small to choke on but can get stuck in a child’s airway and cause an infection.

Soft, sticky foods: Avoid chewing gum and soft foods like marshmallows and jelly or gummy candies that might get lodged in your child’s throat.

Peanut butter: Be careful not to give your toddler large dollops of peanut butter or other nut butters, which can be difficult to swallow. Instead, spread nut butter thinly on bread or crackers. You might want to try thinning it with some applesauce before spreading it.

More choking prevention

  • Avoid letting your child eat in the car since it’s hard to supervise while driving.
  • If you’re using a rub-on teething medication, keep a close eye on your toddler as it can numb his throat and interfere with swallowing.
  • See a printable checklist on how to reduce your child’s risk of choking.

Source: http://www.babycenter.com/0_foods-that-can-be-unsafe-for-your-child_1491465.bc?bclink=top&scid=momstodd_20121009:3&pe=MlV4S29GUXwyMDEyMTAwOQ..

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